SpaceX Rocket’s Launch Unsuccessful

An unmanned cargo space ship heading to the International Space Station exploded midair after few minutes into the flight. We have already talked about Elon Musk and other competitors trying to reduce the costs associated with the launch of space rockets by recovering various components for reuse. Despite the fact that many people would be raising questions, we must not forget that currently there is no reliable mechanism developed by any organization, private or government that can reliably reuse rockets launched into the space.

SpaceX rocket explosion Falcon 9

SpaceX rocket explosion Falcon 9

The explosion took place at 2 minutes and 19 seconds into the flight. On this occasion, NASA’s administrator reflected on the uncertainties faced in space rocket launches, “This is a reminder that spaceflight is an incredible challenge, but we learn from each success and each setback. Today’s launch attempt will not deter us from our ambitious human spaceflight program.”

Here is the initial tweet reaction from Elon Musk.

And this is the conclusion to which the SpaceX team has reached so far.

SpaceX has experienced a very low rate of failures, as it was first for its Falcon 9 in 19 launches. One of the major aims to be accomplished through this launch was to land first stage rocket components on floating platform in Atlantic. Two other rocket launch failures taking place in the recent past included Antares rocket built by ATK and in April a Russian Progress rocket lost control. We know Elon Musk and his determination to succeed. He has braved many difficulties in the past and would come out of it as well.

Here is the full statement of NASA administrator Charles Bolden. (Courtesy NASA Website: For More Click Link)

“We are disappointed in the loss of the latest SpaceX cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. However, the astronauts are safe aboard the station and have sufficient supplies for the next several months. We will work closely with SpaceX to understand what happened, fix the problem and return to flight. The commercial cargo program was designed to accommodate loss of cargo vehicles. We will continue operation of the station in a safe and effective way as we continue to use it as our test bed for preparing for longer duration missions farther into the solar system.

“A Progress vehicle is ready to launch July 3, followed in August by a Japanese HTV flight. Orbital ATK, our other commercial cargo partner, is moving ahead with plans for its next launch later this year.

“SpaceX has demonstrated extraordinary capabilities in its first six cargo resupply missions to the station, and we know they can replicate that success. We will work with and support SpaceX to assess what happened, understand the specifics of the failure and correct it to move forward. This is a reminder that spaceflight is an incredible challenge, but we learn from each success and each setback. Today’s launch attempt will not deter us from our ambitious human spaceflight program.”

Comments are closed here.